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Share Post: Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace  Post Number:#31  Unread postPosted: June 20th, 2016, 2:25 pm

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Joined: January 27th, 2013, 2:52 pm
Last visit: Yesterday, 12:05 am

Total Posts: 8920
Active Topics: 145

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Location: Brisbane Australia
Local time: August 16th, 2018, 11:29 pm
Country:  Australia (au)
My Bike Models: 1981 GL1100 Vetter "Rats Nest"
1987 CBR1000f Naked "The Pig"
1991 CBR1000f "Red"
1998 GL1500c "Val"


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My YouTube Channel
But wait there is more!!

Pre-ride Briefing For Your New Passenger
S/he is the BOSS, but you set the rules

Before I let a passenger onto my bike I host a briefing with them. I explain that so long as they are on my bike THEY are the boss - that if they want to slow down, or to stop, for any reason, we will do so. In other words, the rider controls the bike while the passenger controls the rider! I explain that it is not my intention to scare them, ever, while they are on the bike, but to help them enjoy the experience. In exchange for this there is a price: They have four jobs while riding as passenger, and they must agree to get on and off the bike only with the permission of the driver.

I explain the 'passenger twist' where they connect their helmet cord while facing the bike, then do a full turn clockwise so that the cord wraps behind them before they get on the bike. That they get on and off only while I am on the bike, which is in neutral, and have both feet down and the side stand up (this, because if the side stand is down and they plump themselves on the saddle they will compress the shocks and that will lever the bike to the right - possibly all the way over onto its side!) I nod and tell them it is OK to get on the bike when I'm ready for them. I do the same when I'm ready for them to leave the bike. Finally, I ask that when they mount and dismount the bike they try to keep their weight centered on the bike - that they not pull the bike towards them but, rather, push themselves towards the bike.

I explain that while we are moving they can talk to me if they want, and that they may use the PTT button near their left hand to talk on the CB, but as to moving around, I'd prefer that they pretended to be a sack of potatoes (actually, I tell them they can move about, just not suddenly) - that they NOT try to help me through the turns - that they not lean in anticipation or when we are in a turn.

I tell them that I have never had an accident, but that no matter what happens while we are moving, they are to keep their feet on the passenger floorboards and never, ever, try to touch the ground with their feet to try to hold up the motorcycle. I show them the saddlebag guard rails and point out that they are heavy steel, like 'roll bars', and will protect their legs only so long as their feet remain on those floorboards.

Oh, as to those 'jobs' they have:

• They are to wave at all motorcyclists approaching us in the opposite direction
• They are to wave at all policemen who are on their feet
• They are to wave at all children that show any interest whatever
• They are to demonstrate to the world that they are enjoying themselves, particularly at all rest stops.!
Failing any of those jobs, I declare, will result in them having a new job when the ride is over - the spokes. (There are no spokes on my Wing, of course.)

As to my own personal rules while riding with a passenger:

• The only thing I want to 'show off' is that riding a motorcycle can be safe and enjoyable
• I wish to challenge myself with the task of trying to shift gears without the passenger being aware of the activity (no head snaps in either direction.)
• I want to start and stop with the passenger never quite sure that we have started to move or that we have come to a full stop - i.e., smoothness all around

Passengers Are NOT Helpless
Should something happen to the rider

The general impression amongst motorcyclists is that a passenger would be totally helpless when it comes to controlling the motorcycle should something happen to the rider. Nonsense!

An accident occurred in Ohio, I believe, some years ago where a deer attempted to jump over a motorcycle from the side and hit the rider, knocking him completely off the bike. The man's wife was a passenger at the time and she managed to take control of the bike and get it off to the side of the road and slowed it down so greatly that it simply fell over (into the grass.)

Well, you argue, since there was no rider in front of her she was able to reach the controls.

In fact, even if the rider was still there having, for example, simply collapsed from a heart attack, the passenger can almost always still gain control of the motorcycle.

Two controls that the passenger usually cannot reach are the gear shift lever and the rear brake, but the three that he/she CAN reach are the clutch lever, the throttle, and the front brake. (And, not incidentally, the engine cutoff switch.) Thus, the passenger can steer the bike as well as control its speed.

Even with a rider backrest, a passenger can stand on his/her pegs and lean over the rider to gain control of the bike. Cash and I have practiced this maneuver and demonstrated it to several motorcycle groups at rallies and other gatherings.

It does not take a rider (or anyone at all on the bike) to balance a motorcycle moving at any reasonable speed. Because of trail there is an automatic attempt by all motorcycles to get vertical and steer in a straight line. In other words, though there will likely be some wild gyrations of the bike as it finds its way to a stable posture, there is TIME available to the passenger to get control of that bike.

First order of business is to slow it down. Second order of business is to steer it to as safe a place as possible before it falls over, because fall over it will.

Before it falls over that engine cutoff switch should be turned off.

The passenger is certainly not helpless. Perhaps it would be a good thing to let him/her know it and even practice (at a dead stop, engine off, on the side stand) assuming control, no?

Following is a picture of Cash and myself using my GoldWing in a Co-Rider Safety Demo showing her taking control of my bike even though I was still in the rider's saddle and there is a backrest between us. Note that she was not standing nearly as tall as she could have should she have needed to because I was not as far out of the way as I was in the demo.



[Need I add that this is another reason why a person who prefers being a passenger and never intends to ride a bike by themselves should be encouraged to attend the MSF?]Please note that if she lays on the rider she tends to keep him on the bike. A good thing if traveling at 70 MPH, no



Shock Absorbers Aren't
A detailed discussion of what they really do

By: James R. Davis



If the readers here do not mind, I would like to post an article that talks of shock absorbers in an effort to remove any mystery about what they do and how they work. Safety issues are often merely technology issues - once you understand the technology.

To begin with, they do not absorb shocks - your springs do that.

When your bike hits a bump in the road your wheels can do nothing but follow the curve of that bump. Your tires compress fractionally, but not enough to make a meaningful difference in the effects that bump will have on the rest of the bike, and you. If the wheels of your bike were connected directly to the frame, without springs and shocks, the bike would rise at least as high as the bump, almost instantly. The effect, of course, is that, if severe enough, when the bike came back down you would be left in the air. Your hands would probably not be jerked off the grips, so they would be pulled forward with the rest of the bike while the rest of you was still in the air - and then, worse, you would come down.

Obviously, the fix to that problem is to keep as much of the bike other than the wheels from rising in reaction to that bump (i.e., make as much of the bike as possible 'sprung weight'.) There is a tremendous amount of kinetic energy imparted to the wheels when they hit that bump. That energy must be captured before it is transferred to the bike's frame. And that is exactly what the springs do. By compressing, the springs absorb the energy from the wheels.

Remember pogo sticks? If all you had between the wheels and the frame of your bike were springs, then the only difference the springs would make would be a short delay before the bike was tossed into the air after hitting the bump. That is, once compressed the only thing the springs can do is decompress (that's the law). The energy the springs will exert during decompression is almost equal to the energy that went into compressing them in the first place. (A token amount of the kinetic energy will be converted to heat to make up the difference.)

Now we can understand what the shocks do. They DRAMATICALLY slow down the decompression of your springs (and in the process they convert much more than a token of the total kinetic energy stored in those springs into heat.)

A shock absorber consists of a tube filled with oil, which acts as a hydraulic fluid, and a piston (which is not physically connected to any part of the tube) that slides up and down within that tube, pushing its way through the oil. The piston is connected to one end of the shock absorber via a steel rod, the tube is connected to the other. One end of the shock absorber is connected to the frame of the bike while the other end is connected to the wheel hub (or to a swing arm that is connected to the hub.) Thus, when the wheel moves up towards the rest of the bike the piston is pushed thru the oil. The oil provides resistance to the movement of the piston which slows it down. In the process kinetic energy is converted to heat. (This is why you must change your shock absorber oil regularly - the heat breaks it down.) The oil in these tubes would totally stop the movement of the piston were it not for the existence of a valve in the piston that allowed the fluid to pass thru it. This is because, like water, the oil cannot itself be compressed. That valve can be made to allow fluids to flow faster in one direction than the other. For example, you would probably want your springs to compress faster than they are allowed to decompress. Without that valve your springs would not compress at all, leaving you as bad off as if the wheels were directly connected to the frame. Similarly, if the springs are too strong for the load they are carrying, too much of the kinetic energy will be conveyed directly to the frame of the bike, because they will compress too slowly, if at all.

But just as slowing the compression rate of the springs too much results in ineffective control of bumps, allowing their decompression to happen too quickly is just as bad. Were that to happen you would have 'pogo stick' reactions to bumps. So, it is essential that the design of the springs and shocks on your bike take into account how heavy the bike is and what kind of riding you do. But all such designs are compromises, and you can do things to totally frustrate the designers intentions - and end up hurt or worse as a result.

For example, when you put a passenger or heavy luggage on your bike you should increase the tension of the springs surrounding your shocks. Failing to do that can overload the system and get you close to the 'pogo stick' level of responses from them. Taking a street machine into the country, off road, and pretending it's a motocross machine can do the same.

But even assuming you don't do anything that extreme you will find that the design of your shocks is not perfect. (If it was, you would never feel a bump in the road.) The fact is, sometimes the road surface changes from perfectly level to bumpy. And some of those bumps (and potholes) can be awesome. This is where a few dollars can make a difference. You can replace the springs that come stock on your bike with a set that are called 'progressives'. These provide a normal soft ride until they are confronted with an unusually severe bump, at which point they get harder and harder to compress. And while the oil in the shocks cannot be compressed, air can be. So some shocks are 'air assisted' - in addition to the oil they have a small amount of air in the tubes. These 'air assisted' shock systems are sometimes attached to an onboard compressor that can be used to increase or decrease the pressure of the air, thus making the shocks either harder or softer without having to change the compression of the springs when your load weight or the road surface changes substantially. (Also, of course, you can increase the weight of the oil in the shocks to slow them down.)

The shock absorber 'system' on your rear wheel tends to have larger springs and have them mounted on the outside of the hydraulic tubes while the one on your front wheel have the springs within the tubes. The ones in the front are contained within the 'forks'. If you take a close look at your shocks you will find that the ones in the rear are typically angled forward from the wheel to the frame of the bike while the ones in the front are angled backwards. These angles tend to be directly in-line with weight shifts resulting from acceleration and braking.

The angle of the front shocks (forks), usually called the bike's 'rake', is essential to maintain! It establishes, along with the front-end 'offset', the bike's 'trail' which determines the bikes handling and steering control. The more extreme the rake is on your bike, the 'slower' your steering will be. (Except at extremely slow speeds - where extreme rakes often result in the wheel 'flopping' over and dumping the bike if you do not have your hands firmly in control of the grips.) If you were, for example, to lower your bike by shortening the front and back shocks, the wheelbase would also be shortened (the distance between the front and back tires). Since your front wheel would touch the ground closer to directly under your handlebars, your steering would 'quicken' as a result. In fact, even shortening the shocks by only one inch could result in steering that was so fast that your steering damper (another small shock absorber) could not safely handle it. The result, known as a 'tank slapper', would be violent swings of the wheel from side to side, and with high probability a dumped bike. (That is an overstatement. If you absorb some of the oscillation into your arms and avoid transferring that into the rest of the bike (through your contact with the seat), or use some braking caused weight transfer to the front of the bike, you can abort the 'harmonic' and probably avoid dumping it.)

In short, your shock absorbers are designed to help keep your tires on the ground regardless of surface imperfections so that they can do work for you.

Your shock absorber systems make your bike controllable. Make sure they receive factory recommended oil changes, do not modify them, adjust them for major changes in the weight of your vehicle or expected road conditions, and they will do their jobs reliably.



Tire Pressure
More temperature sensitive than you might think

As we are now into the colder months of the year I thought it appropriate to post a reminder about tire pressures and the effect of temperature on same.

Stamped on the outside of many of your tires is a recommended tire pressure range. (At least an upper limit.) For longest tire life it is my recommendation that you strive to keep them at the higher limit of those recommendations (regardless of what your motorcycle owner's manual might say to the contrary.) Further, this pressure should be determined while the tires are cold - meaning, have not been used for a couple of hours.

Time and outside temperature effect the pressure within your tires. It is NORMAL for a tire to lose about 1 pound per square inch (psi) per month. Outside temperatures affect your tire pressure far more profoundly, however. A tire's pressure can change by 1 psi for every 10 degrees Fahrenheit of temperature change. As temperature goes, so goes pressure.

For example, if a tire is found to have 38 psi on an 80-degree mid-summer day, it could lose enough air to have an inflation pressure of 26 psi on a 20-degree day six months later. This represents a loss of 6 psi over six months and an additional loss of 6 psi due to the 60 degree temperature reduction.

At 26 psi, your tire is severely under inflated and dangerous!

There is nothing wrong with your tire if it behaves like this, of course. What is being illustrated here is that you MUST check your tire pressure on a regular basis (about once a week is reasonable) and to be particularly aware of it on cold days.



Tire Plugs
Apparently little known facts that are important

Sometimes you can't win. I just had to replace a virtually new Elite II rear tire on my motorcycle because it had picked up a couple of small nails.

I know, all I really had to do was plug the tire. Right? Wrong!

Here are a few things you might consider about tire plugs:

• Almost any single puncture (thru the tread) can be repaired by the use of a tire plug. (I would be willing to ride with a properly {from the inside} plugged tire anytime.)
• You cannot put more than one plug within the same quadrant of a tire - safely.
• You cannot put more than two plugs into a tire - period.

The manufacturers of tire plugs specifically disavow the safety of doing either of the last two items listed above. They also void their speed warranties as a result of any tire plugging. Your tire is probably marked with an 'H' speed designation, meaning it is rated for safety up to 130 MPH. If you have even one tire plug in it you should not drive faster than about 80 MPH using that tire.

I had picked up three small nails in my tire. All three leaked air when I removed them. 'My kingdom for a horse!' It cost me $150 for another new Elite II. (Life is too important to be left in the hands of three plugs when the manufacturers refuse to stand up for their safety.)

[In case you missed it earlier, every reference made here about 'tire plugs' refers to professionally installed, from the inside, tire repair plugs - NOT the emergency roadside repair kits which install from the outside of your tire.]


Synthetic Oils
Almost always better than petroleum based

In almost all cases the use of synthetic oil (at least now) is better in your motorcycle than straight petroleum based oil. But not in all cases. Oil additives with Teflon® in them, for example, don't make any sense to me.

I guess some people might not understand that a good part of petroleum based oils are synthetics anyway (virtually all the additives). Thus, we already have some experience with synthetic lubricating fluids in our engines.

The principal drawback to the synthetics is that they are more expensive than straight petroleum based oils. But in exchange for that higher price you usually get your money's worth. Longer life before they have to be changed, more consistent performance regardless of temperature or engine RPM, better lubrication (more slippery), as well as all the functions of better oils with their additives.

But your oil does more than help pieces of metal slide/roll easier. It has the job of loosening and keeping in suspension sludge and varnish. It has the job of absorbing moisture to inhibit rust and to diminish corrosion. It has to have sufficient variability in viscosity to continue to do its job regardless of temperature changes. It has to be able to withstand shear forces as well as heat and pressure. And, not incidentally, they must not destroy seals while they work.

Generally, synthetics are made today that do all of this, and more, as well as or better than petroleum based oils.

Some synthetics were not as well designed in the past as they are today. Mobil-1, for example, used to eat seals, for example, but it no longer does.

Manufacturers recommend against using synthetics during your engine break-in period. This, because these oils are too slippery and normal break-in wear would not take place as quickly as without them.

Many of those manufacturers used to advise against mixing synthetics with regular oils until they found that they were denying themselves of much of their markets by doing so. Now these synthetics are made so that they can be mixed without any trouble (But I would recommend NOT doing so in any event.)

It is simply not very smart to put some brands of synthetic additives into a motorcycle - such as 'Slick 50'. First, because you run a wet clutch and this kind of synthetic could render your clutch quite inefficient and possibly useless, depending on how much of that product you use. (If not, there may well come a time when you elect to no longer use it and you may well find that your clutch has to be rebuilt just to get rid of what was in there.)

Second, because their claim of bonding Teflon® to metal cannot be true, and if the manufacturers of that product need to rely on false claims to sell their products, what else might they be saying that you are relying on?

Third, because Teflon® is a SOLID! Your oil filter is designed to get rid of solids. Teflon® greatly increases in size with high temperatures - so even if the microscopic sized particles will travel thru your filter to start with, there will come a time when you actually ride your bike and it warms up. Then there are all the other oil flow surfaces and oil passageways that will get smaller as a result of being coated with Teflon®. In any event, the next Tip will discuss additives containing Teflon® in detail.

In summary, I agree that virtually all the synthetic oils are better for your motorcycle than are regular petroleum based oils. They are more expensive, but probably worth the added cost. Your shifting will be easier, you can go longer between oil changes, and you should experience slightly less engine wear by using them.

[Not incidentally, you can expect about a 1% increase in engine power if you use synthetics.]

Teflon® is a registered trademark of DuPont.


Weight Transfer
What is it, why does it happen, and why should you care?

When you change speed (accelerate or decelerate) the weight of your motorcycle (including you) shifts in such a way as to put more or less load on your tires. You do not have to weigh the load on your tires to know this with certainty because you can see it happen by observing your front-end 'dive' when you brake.

Traction is proportional to the weight carried by your tires. Thus, when you brake your front tire gains traction while the rear one loses it. Clearly losing too much traction is dangerous since the result is that your tire will slide.

Despite what you may think, weight transfer can be controlled beyond simply adjusting your acceleration and braking rates. That is, how fast you change speeds is not the only thing that determines weight transfer. Surely you would be interested in minimizing the odds of losing traction during a panic stop? Read on...

Braking Transfers

Ignoring wind resistance, essentially all the forces that try to slow you down when you apply your brakes are at ground level. That is, at the contact patches of your tires. On the other hand, the inertia of your bike works not at ground level, but directly thru its center of gravity (CG.) Since the CG is higher than ground level the resulting net force translates into a torque. In other words, braking does not simply shift weight forward, it tries to shift it down in the front and up in the rear.

The higher the CG is, the greater the torque. (If the CG was at ground level the torque would be zero.) On the other hand, the longer your wheelbase is, the lesser the torque. This is just another way of saying that the amount of weight transfer resulting from a change in speed is a function of the ratio of the height of the CG to the length of the wheelbase.

Gravity is a force. At ground level gravity tries to make you fall with acceleration at the rate of about 32.1 feet per second per second (henceforth shown as fps/sec.) This acceleration is called '1 g.'

'Weight' is just another word for gravity. Like inertia, gravity works directly thru the CG of an object.

When we brake we apply force which we will simply call a braking force. Braking is nothing more than a negative acceleration. Thus, when the total braking force is such that your bike's forward speed is being reduced at the rate of approximately 32.1 fps/sec, you are decelerating at the rate of 1 g. That is, your braking force then equals the weight of the motorcycle (including the rider.) If your motorcycle weights 1,000 pounds, then braking at 1 g means you are applying 1,000 pounds of braking force.

You can calculate the amount of weight transfer involved in any stop knowing only the braking force being used and the ratio of CG height to wheelbase length. For example, if the total braking force is 1,000 pounds, your CG is 20 inches off the ground, and your wheelbase is 63.4 inches long:

Wt.Transfer = Braking Force times CG ratio

Wt.Transfer = 1000 lbs. * 20/63.4

Wt.Transfer = 1000 lbs. * .3155

Wt.Transfer = 315.5 lbs.

[We are here discounting entirely the effects caused by tire distortion and suspension compression. Not because these are not important, but because they are of secondary importance to an understanding of these principals.]

Now, just because the bike weighs 1,000 pounds and is sitting on two wheels does not mean that at rest there are 500 pounds on each wheel. Here again we need to know something about the bike's CG. Only if the CG is exactly in the middle of the bike (between contact patches) will the weight be evenly distributed. If the CG is closer to the front wheel than the rear one, for example, then there will be more weight on the front tire than on the rear when the bike is at rest (not moving.) Further, unless there is an upward or downward movement of the bike, the sum of the weight carried by the front and rear tires must equal the total weight of the motorcycle and rider.

Let us assume that at rest the weight is evenly distributed. Then we now know that while braking at 1 g, because of weight transfer, there will be 815.5 lbs. (500 + 315.5) on the front tire and only 184.5 lbs. (500 - 315.5) on the rear tire. Because traction is a function of weight carried by a tire it is clear that there is not a lot of traction left on the rear tire at this time.

Let us look very carefully at what this weight transfer example is showing us. You have heard that you have about 70% of your stopping power in the front brake. This example shows that we have applied 1,000 lbs. of braking power to the tires of the bike. If it was ALL the result of using only the front brake, then we have wasted what traction is still available to us from the rear tire and, worse, we have locked our front tire and started a skid! This, because virtually all standard tires lose their 'sticktion' (stick/friction) when confronted with more than about 1.1 g of braking force. With 815.5 lbs. on the front tire it could with reasonable confidence handle a braking force of 897 lbs. (1.1 * 815.5), yet we applied 1,000 lbs. to it. At least in this case our front brakes could deliver nearly 90% of our stopping power, not just 70% - but not 100%, either.

Now let us look at what would happen if the CG happened to be 30 inches high rather than 20:

Wt.Transfer = Braking Force times CG ratio

Wt.Transfer = 1000 lbs. * 30/63.4

Wt.Transfer = 1000 lbs. * .4732

Wt.Transfer = 473.2 lbs.

The front tire would have 973.2 lbs. of weight on it and the rear would have only 26.8 lbs. This is close to doing a 'stoppie'!!!

What we are beginning to see is that if the CG gets to a height of 1/2 of the length of the wheelbase we can expect to do a 'stoppie' if we use 1 g of braking force. Further, if we use even the slightest amount of rear brake in such a configuration when we are slowing at the rate of 1 g, we can expect to lock the rear wheel.

One more example - we will attempt a 1.1 g stop with this 'higher' bike:

Wt.Transfer = Braking Force times CG ratio

Wt.Transfer = 1100 lbs. * 30/63.4

Wt.Transfer = 1100 lbs. * .4732

Wt.Transfer = 520.5 lbs.

At this point we have transferred MORE than the entire weight which had been on the rear wheel - we have left the rear wheel with NEGATIVE 20.5 lbs. on it. i.e., our rear wheel has been lifted off the ground!!!!

Notice, please, that the CG does NOT remain at a constant height during aggressive braking. If we use exclusively front brake, then the front-end will dive and the rear-end will lift. This could result in the CG remaining at the same height, but more likely it will get higher. We have already seen that a higher CG means more weight transfer. Further, as the front-end dives the result of the compression of the front shocks is a shortening of the wheelbase of the bike. This, like raising the CG, results in a higher CG to wheelbase ratio, and therefore more weight transfer. [As an aside, if your bike has an anti-dive feature (TRAC, for example) then MORE weight transfer occurs to the front wheel than without it. This, because the CG is held higher. In other words, anti-dive INCREASES the odds of sliding your rear tire!]

If only the rear brake is used there will be a weight transfer to the front tire which will tend to compress the shocks. Additionally, however, use of the rear brake tends to LOWER the rear-end of your motorcycle and lengthens its wheelbase, (the swing arm become more level). The net effect is to lower the CG of the bike. This offsets neatly the fact that the compressing front-end shortens the wheelbase at the same time. However, since there is a weight transfer, the rear-end gets lighter while braking which quickly limits how much braking power you can apply before you skid that tire. In other words, you must use the front brake for maximum stopping power.

From the above discussion I think you can now see that the use of your rear brake along with the front brake leads to less weight transfer than if you use only the front brake, and why the use of both at the same time always results in maximum stopping power.

When a rider mounts his motorcycle he both raises the CG and moves it towards the rear. The heavier the rider, the more significant these changes to the CG are. We already know that as the CG rises it causes more weight transfer during speed changes. This raising of the CG is far more significant than is its shift towards the rear. (This, because the height of the CG is small compared to the length of the wheelbase.)

What this adds up to is that the heavier the driver of the motorcycle, the easier it is for braking to cause a breakaway of the rear-end. Is there anything that can be done to mitigate this potentially deadly problem? You bet! In a panic stop the driver should bend from the hip and elbows and lean forward! This will cause the CG to lower and move forward. A lower CG is more significant than its slight movement forward. In summary, there will be less weight transfer with him leaning forward than if he was sitting straight up in the saddle, there will be less compression of the front shocks, and less shortening of the wheelbase. i.e., less likelihood of losing rear-end traction.

Anything else? Yep. Always pack your saddlebags with heavy items towards the bottom. Every pound below the CG lowers it, every pound above it raises it.

_________________________________



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Share Post: Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace  Post Number:#32  Unread postPosted: June 20th, 2016, 2:28 pm

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Joined: January 27th, 2013, 2:52 pm
Last visit: Yesterday, 12:05 am

Total Posts: 8920
Active Topics: 145

Total Images: 1126
Location: Brisbane Australia
Local time: August 16th, 2018, 11:29 pm
Country:  Australia (au)
My Bike Models: 1981 GL1100 Vetter "Rats Nest"
1987 CBR1000f Naked "The Pig"
1991 CBR1000f "Red"
1998 GL1500c "Val"


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There is even more to this document with charts and a picture of a wheel standing GL1800. I have the document saved but not a link so if anyone wants an emailed copy send me your address.

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Share Post: Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace  Post Number:#33  Unread postPosted: June 20th, 2016, 2:35 pm

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Joined: October 6th, 2015, 2:08 pm
Last visit: August 8th, 2018, 5:37 pm

Total Posts: 243
Active Topics: 13

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Location: Thonotosassa FL
Local time: August 16th, 2018, 9:29 am
Country:  United States (us)
My Bike Models: 2001 Royal Enfield Bullet Classic

1985 GL1200I Interstate

Others in the future. . .


Profile Personal album

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There is even more to this document with charts and a picture of a wheel standing GL1800. I have the document saved but not a link so if anyone wants an emailed copy send me your address.



:shock: :swoon:

That's so much information!!!! I'll PM you my email. . .

_________________________________

Jon "Daeouse" aka "Squirrel"
Mistake Maker Extraordinaire
Rabid Oldwing Enthusiast
"Builder of Freebie"


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Share Post: Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace  Post Number:#34  Unread postPosted: June 20th, 2016, 2:36 pm

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Joined: January 27th, 2013, 2:52 pm
Last visit: Yesterday, 12:05 am

Total Posts: 8920
Active Topics: 145

Total Images: 1126
Location: Brisbane Australia
Local time: August 16th, 2018, 11:29 pm
Country:  Australia (au)
My Bike Models: 1981 GL1100 Vetter "Rats Nest"
1987 CBR1000f Naked "The Pig"
1991 CBR1000f "Red"
1998 GL1500c "Val"


Profile Personal album

My YouTube Channel
No worries :good:

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Share Post: Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace  Post Number:#35  Unread postPosted: June 20th, 2016, 2:52 pm

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Daeouse wrote:
There is even more to this document with charts and a picture of a wheel standing GL1800. I have the document saved but not a link so if anyone wants an emailed copy send me your address.



:shock: :swoon:

That's so much information!!!! I'll PM you my email. . .

Just by reading this you are already ahead of the game as far as most beginners go. It is scary as to how many "bikers" there are that just crawl on and go. Knowledge can and will save your life as much as practice, if you use both to the fullest you have already been further in life than many will ever make it . Never ever ever think your too good to wreck .... the information is here and will remain here you can find it so long as some big mean admin doesnt delete it , that being said man be safe flow with the bike (as corny as it sounds) be one with the bike because that is how you stay alive . This is not a game it is life or death out there as it is with any sport and if you dont think this is a sport you dont deserve a motorcycle. If your not out cruising the roads til your walking bow legged a wing is not for you . They are amazing peices of machinery and if you treat them right they will treat you right for a very long time ......

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Share Post: Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace  Post Number:#36  Unread postPosted: June 20th, 2016, 3:01 pm

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Now commit all that to memory so when you have 1 1/2 seconds to react you can process it all and apply it, RIGHT! what was that he said.

All good information, but when the you know what hits the fan, your instincts and experience are going to take over. I have actually seen a rider run into something that he could have easily avoided just because he panicked. I truly believe in practicing evasive maneuvers and max braking but most importantly I believe is situational awareness at all times.

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Share Post: Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace  Post Number:#37  Unread postPosted: June 20th, 2016, 3:14 pm

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AMEN SING IT BROTHER.....

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Share Post: Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace  Post Number:#38  Unread postPosted: June 20th, 2016, 3:32 pm

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Now commit all that to memory so when you have 1 1/2 seconds to react you can process it all and apply it, RIGHT! what was that he said.

All good information, but when the you know what hits the fan, your instincts and experience are going to take over. I have actually seen a rider run into something that he could have easily avoided just because he panicked. I truly believe in practicing evasive maneuvers and max braking but most importantly I believe is situational awareness at all times.


Object fixation!!
The most important and the hardest one to train yourself out of. Most crashed drivers/riders report after the event that they saw the problem but couldn't avoid it. You need to see the solution as quickly as possible after seeing the problem and stick to it!! :good:
As stated "practice, practice, practice" all situations especially avoidance and emergency braking etc.

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Share Post: Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace  Post Number:#39  Unread postPosted: June 20th, 2016, 4:39 pm

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Thanks, all! I am soaking in all the wisdom I can get!

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Jon "Daeouse" aka "Squirrel"
Mistake Maker Extraordinaire
Rabid Oldwing Enthusiast
"Builder of Freebie"


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Share Post: Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace  Post Number:#40  Unread postPosted: June 20th, 2016, 5:23 pm

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Some of the most embarrassing lay downs are when your completely stopped...


Around here, if the she goes down on her side when stopped it is only because she wants to take a nap!! :yes: :hihihi: :ahem:

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Share Post: Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace  Post Number:#41  Unread postPosted: June 20th, 2016, 5:31 pm

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Some of the most embarrassing lay downs are when your completely stopped...


Around here, if the she goes down on her side when stopped it is only because she wants to take a nap!! :yes: :hihihi: :ahem:


Perfectly reasonable! LOL! :hihihi:

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Share Post: Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace  Post Number:#42  Unread postPosted: June 20th, 2016, 7:29 pm

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I've put mine down on the side twice, both times I was stopped.
I found out that hard way that decent boots really are better than tennis shoes for riding, (and gripping the ground better on gravel)

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Share Post: Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace  Post Number:#43  Unread postPosted: June 20th, 2016, 7:31 pm

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dan filipi wrote:
I've put mine down on the side twice, both times I was stopped.
I found out that hard way that decent boots really are better than tennis shoes for riding, (and gripping the ground better on gravel)

Sometimes boots dont help.... she needed a nap :)Image

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N920A using Tapatalk

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Share Post: Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace  Post Number:#44  Unread postPosted: June 20th, 2016, 7:47 pm

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dan filipi wrote:
I've put mine down on the side twice, both times I was stopped.
I found out that hard way that decent boots really are better than tennis shoes for riding, (and gripping the ground better on gravel)

Sometimes boots dont help.... she needed a nap :)Image

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N920A using Tapatalk


Well obviously you weren't committed enough for off-road racing with your wing. . . :hihihi: :roll: :whistling:

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Jon "Daeouse" aka "Squirrel"
Mistake Maker Extraordinaire
Rabid Oldwing Enthusiast
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Share Post: Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on TumblrShare on Google+Share on MySpace  Post Number:#45  Unread postPosted: June 20th, 2016, 8:51 pm

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Yea she slid and bottoomed out on me ....words of advise if it starts to go just let her fall DO NOT TRY TO SAVE IT!!!! A goldwing will break you if your not careful.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N920A using Tapatalk

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